The American Jobs Act, Unemployment Discrimination and Employment Brand

Online recruiting organizations: Are you ready to stop hiding from candidates? You should be. Your brand depends on it.

With The American Job Act currently before Congress, employers would be subject to EEOC discrimination claims if they fail to hire an unemployed candidate based on the fact that they are not currently employed. The notion was hatched as a backlash against the perception that employers do not want to hire unemployed workers.

That’s a specific law with a specific target, but if you peel the layers back, it’s the first salvo fired out of frustration from a country full of candidates that are tired of being treated badly by the people, systems and processes that have grown up around recruiting in the last 10 years.

I get it. Recruiting organizations are under siege by way too many qualified candidates for the positions they have. More importantly, they’re under siege by way too many completely UNqualified candidates.

While not considering candidates that are unemployed may cut your candidate pool down to a manageable size, it’s not smart from a branding standpoint. Unless your employment brand is cold and cutthroat, you should embrace all candidates. You should treat them with respect and you should engage as many of them as possible.

Everyone wants a fair shot. That’s just part of being human. And when sweeping generalizations like “we don’t consider unemployed candidates” take hold, or faceless applicant tracking systems process bits and bytes and spit out rejection emails (often delayed to appear like the candidate was considered by a human), then the appearance of a fair shot disappears.

Candidates are customers. Candidates are voters. Candidates are individuals capable of expressing their frustration to large numbers of other individuals through social networking.

Here is and actual tweet I came across the day after writing this article: “@jimcramer FYI you herd it here first, Taleo is keeping the unemployed… unemployed.”

Obviously, not everyone is qualified. And every recruiter has tales of resume spammers and unqualified, unprepared candidates sucking their time. But the fact is, if you appear not to care about candidates, then your brand suffers. And now with an entire nation who is totally focused on getting people placed in jobs, delivering bad candidate experiences is asking for more Federal regulations governing how you interact with candidates.

There is a quietly growing awareness in the industry that candidate satisfaction matters. There is a faint notion growing that engaging candidates and trying to ensure that they are communicated with and treated with respect and reverence, will actually result in a more effective recruiting process.

There are tools available that allow organizations to engage candidates and solicit feedback throughout the recruiting process. Companies can now listen to how candidates feel about their recruiting process from beginning to end, track satisfaction and fine tune practices to make them as effective as possible.They sit on top of a company’s career site pages and asks candidates what they think, in real time and with appropriately times follow up surveys.

Without fail, candidates regularly comment “Thank you for asking my opinion.” So when I say treating candidates with respect helps your employment brand, I speak from experience. Your “Best Place to Work” badge is fine, but it just lays there. Asking a candidate what they think about how they’ve been treated? That shifts the earth a little bit and provides evidence that you have a great place to work.

Plus it provides a goldmine of ideas about how to better interact with candidates, tweak your career site and make your online recruiting efforts more effective for passive candidates. The one’s who already have jobs. The one’s you were targeting that got the White House involved in messing with your business in the first place.

Nokia E65 – A Stylish Way To Work

Nokia's E series mobile phones have always been dubbed as enterprise solutions aimed at business users and professionals. Therefore, more than its designing aspects or its positioning, the company has embarked on the handset's functionality. As report has it, Microsoft Office documents editing software kit embedded in Eseries features notably better than Microsoft's very own applications for Windows Mobile. The Nokia E65 – a member of this family of business phone brings in the much needed style quotient to the other serious looking E series mobile phones.

The Nokia E65 is a slider that belongs to the 'slim is in' category, being one of Nokia's smallest sliders. This S60 platform based, Symbian OS v9.1 operated smartphone is available in flsy red and a more sober mocca solution. A large, TFT based QVGA display dominate the front fascia of this slider. The screen is capable of producing an astounding 16 million different hues across 240×320 pixels. Silver shaded keypads enhances the appeal further. A set of spaced out numeric keys and a 5D navigational button makes it very easy to use the Nokia E65 .

The handset's face lift has no way affected the level of functionality that an E series mobile phone is expected to exhibit. The Nokia E65 is loaded with all possible tools and technologies to aid businessmen and professionals, optimize their capabilities. From the most 'basic' feature like integrated hands free to high end connectivity options like WiFi and VoIP over WLAN find their place in the feature list. The Nokia E65 boasts of a full fledged Office Application and an already enhanced PIM that includes calender, to do list and printing. Its Push to Talk feature allows its user to use the mobile phone just like a walkie talkie over a cellular network.

The handset's almost unending feature list includes 3G, GPRS, EDGE, Bluetooth, Infrared, USB, a 2.0 megapixel camera and a Symbian media player.

Pitlochry Vacations – What To Do When Visiting Pitlochry

Pitlochry vacations are now becoming increasingly popular not only with those who live in the UK, but also with tourists from around the world. Not only does this area of ​​Scotland offer some really stunning scenery but also there are plenty of other things that one can do while staying here.

In this article, we take a look at some of the attractions that you may want to consider visiting during a stay in Pitlochry. Surely, you may find that you need to stay more than a few days in order to enjoy everything that this town and the surrounding area have to offer.

1. Pitlochry Dam – This was built because a power station was needed to provide electricity to the area. When it was built, a new loch was also created and because of this, they had to build a salmon ladder, which allowed the salmon to get upstream, where they would breed.

During your visit to the dam, you are able to see a portion of the ladder that has been enclosed in glass to view just how the salmon make their annual journey to their breeding grounds. This actual exhibition is open from Easter until the last Sunday of October from 10.00 to 17.30 each day.

2. Eradour Distillery – This is the smallest of all Scotland's distilleries and upon your visit will be provided with a wee dram (small glass) of the whiskey that they produce. Tours of the distillery take place regular through the year, but during the winter months (November through to February) there opening hours are different from those in the summer.

3. Killiecrankie Visitor Center – This is to be found outside Pitlochry on the A9 and it is here where you can learn about the Jacobite Rebellion that took place in 1689. It was this rebellion, which was harvested to gain independence for Scotland from England. However, the leader of the rebellion a gentleman called John Graham was killed at the battle, which occurred at Killiecrankie, and this rebellion was defeated by the English troops.

4. Loch Rannoch – This is one of the largest and longest lochs in Scotland and is a short drive away from Pitlochry. This loch is in fact famous as it is actually included in Robert Louis Stevenson's book Kidnapped because he was so impressed with the loch's setting.

Along with the attractions, we have mentioned above when it comes to Pitlochry vacations you will find that there are plenty of other things one can do. Why not spend some time exploring the surrounding countryside. Alternately, if you are feeling a little more adventurous then why not try some water sports which can be found at many of the surrounding lochs.

There are lots of hotels and guest houses in Pitlochry to make your stay a pleasant one. You can then relax and take in the joys of this beautiful part of Scotland.

Thunder Megaphone – A Glacial Valley Can Focus and Amplify Thunder Into a Most Extraordinary Sound

We’ve all heard thunder, and we all know what causes it. Many of us have heard two distinct kinds of thunder, but perhaps we never really noticed or thought about it. Recently, I heard a third kind of thunder.

“Ordinary” thunder – a thoroughly extraordinary sound, but the kind of thunder we hear most often – happens when lightning occurs at some distance from the observer. The initial sound of the lightning bolt echoes off surrounding objects and air masses. Because it is echoed so many times, the thunder stretches out into many, many seconds, even though the initial sound might have lasted a second or two at most. Moreover, because the initial sound echoes off soft things with indistinct surfaces – clouds, thermoclines, and weather fronts – and because many echoes reach the ears of the observer at different times, the original sound is greatly distorted. Almost all high frequency components are filtered out, and the observer hears mostly a low-pitched rumble.

When lightning strikes very close to the observer, within a few hundred feet, the sound is entirely different. The observer might not hear echoes of the thunder at all, but only the pure initial sound. It is a single, sharp, intense “POW!” It may be followed by a much quieter, but still loud, whistling or hissing sound.

But what about that third kind of lightning?

I was camping alone in Crawford Notch State Park in northern New Hampshire, when thunderstorms began rolling into the valley just after dinner. I tidied up my campsite just before the rain started, then retreated to my tent. One thunderstorm passed without much incident.

Darkness had fallen by the time the second thunderstorm rolled up from the south. I occupied myself by counting the time interval between lightning and thunder to track the movements of the storms. Fifteen seconds before the thunder rolled up from somewhere west of Mount Bemis, and I knew the storm was just under three miles southwest of me. Seven seconds between the flash and the rumble beyond Frankenstein Cliff, and I knew the storm was passing nearly a mile and a half to my west.

And then it happened!

A flash. I counted eleven seconds. And I heard a sound unlike any thunder I had ever heard before.

The cacophony included at least half a dozen rapid repetitions of the “POW!” of a nearby lightning strike. But at the same time, there was the rumbling and roaring of “ordinary” thunder, but much, much louder than usual.

Before I could figure out what that sound was, there was another flash somewhere to the north. Again I counted eleven seconds, and again I heard that utterly incredible crackling and powing and rumbling and roaring.

This time, I figured it out.

It was a lightning strike right within the upper reaches of Crawford Notch just a couple of miles north of me. It was right within a gigantic stone megaphone formed by Webster Cliff on the east, Mount Field and Mount Willey on the west, and the old glacial cirque of Mount Willard for a backstop on the north.

And this 1,500 foot deep, three-mile-long granite megaphone was pointed right at Dry River Campground.

Yes, the beautiful U-shaped glacial valley of Crawford Notch is a nearly perfect megaphone, albeit open on top. The bare stone faces of Mount Willard and Webster Cliff echoed the initial “POW!” of the thunder almost undistorted. The western slope of the notch is a bit more heavily wooded, but there’s enough bare ledge and rockslide there to provide a pretty good echo. The open top of the notch was covered by the underbelly of the thunderstorm itself, which provided enough of a soft echoic surface to create the usual rumbling of thunder in addition to the clean “POW!” echoes off the rock faces.

But all of this sound was extraordinarily loud because of the megaphone that focused it all right on me and my campsite.

After I got this all figured out, there was a third lightning flash in the north. Yes, eleven second later, there was that glorious, unearthly sound again.

I wondered why I had never heard this kind of thunder before. I have probably experienced thunderstorms in Crawford Notch at least a dozen times over the years, but never heard the Thunder Megaphone.

My best guess is that I probably have heard it before, but never noticed it. Most of the times I’ve camped there, it was with a crowd of friends and family. Much goes on when a thunderstorm rolls in. Ponchos have to be broken out and put on, while at the same time, various disorderly what-nots need to get stashed into cars and tents before they get soaked. There is a bit of yelling and shouting to be done, and paradoxically among the mayhem, kids and dogs need to have their fears calmed. Meanwhile, tarps over the tents and picnic tables are flapping in the gales, making a poor imitation of thunder themselves.

In all my 25 years camping in Crawford Notch, this may have been the first time I experienced a thunderstorm while I was camping there alone. There was no tarp over the tent, and I had anticipated the thunderstorm well enough to get everything into the car long before the rain started.

So, when the lightning and thunder came, I had nothing to do but observe.

What a treat!

I half hope we get a thunderstorm the next time we go camping in the mouth of the Thunder Megaphone.